Computer Case, Mid Tower, Full Tower PC Case | Buying PC Case
Computer Case, Mid Tower, Full Tower PC Case | Buying PC Case - Think24 Gaming & Gadgets Qatar

Computer Case, Mid Tower, Full Tower PC Case | Buying PC Case

Computer Case, Mid Tower, Full Tower PC Case | Buying PC Case

  • PC cases are built in multiple tiers, which not only increases profits for brands but also gives customers more control over the features and cases they select. 
  • There are affordable and pricey PC case options available depending on your demands and gaming or workstation experience.
  • A Computer Case supporting the largest E-ATX motherboard designs is likely to have the physical space for ITX, Micro ATX, and regular ATX board sizes.

Before examining the various case features available, it is important to understand form factors. We've looked into this with motherboards, and the system used by PC cases is very similar. Manufacturers like Corsair, and Lian Li design a chassis around motherboard form factor, with small ITX designs, Micro ATX designs, and larger ATX & E-ATX design options available.

Mid Tower & Full Tower Case

In the case of spec sheets, the terms "Mid Tower" and "Full Tower" may also be used. With more compact and larger design options based on the same motherboard form factor, this raises the bar for motherboard form factors. The goal is to build cases in multiple tiers, which not only increases profits for brands but also gives customers more control over the features and cases they select.

Because it will influence so many of your other part choices, the case form factor is crucial. Following that, there may have a significant impact on the costs of your other components. The cost of the parts and machining will make large cases that use a "full tower" design more expensive. On the flip side, really small Mini ITX cases will also demand a price premium, due to the specialist nature of their design and manufacture.

Thus, for those concerned with value for money, Micro ATX and ATX Mid Tower cases may be the best choices. With no need for compact GPUs or smaller form factor power supplies, these designs are also more likely to fit standard component sizes, lowering the cost.

Buying PC Case

At best, purchasing a PC case is a tedious task. Before visiting a store or shopping online, there are numerous features and factors to take into consideration. However, once you are aware of your PC needs, the cost is the next issue to consider.

While many PC cases are simply empty shells waiting to be filled with components, some manufacturers offer additional inclusive features that can be purchased along with the case. There are affordable and pricey PC case options available depending on your demands and gaming or workstation experience.

Computer Case Price

Most expensive PC cases can regulate your computer's noise level or cooling capacity, for example, even if they do not come with the necessary hardware. On your desk at work, they may also appear more aesthetically pleasing. Usually, wood, aluminum, steel, and tempered glass are used to make the cases. Hardware compatibility, cooling systems, airflow options, build quality, dual PC configuration, different panel and filter types, GPU mounts, and others are crucial aspects to take into consideration.

What to Consider while buying PC Case?

Motherboard support is an important area to consider when buying a case. For those looking to build a small form factor system, you’ll want a case with support for the smallest ITX motherboards. For those looking at the most expansion possible, you’ll want a design with ATX or E-ATX motherboard support. As a general rule, the more versatile a case is with its support for motherboards, the larger the case will likely be.

A case that supports the largest E-ATX motherboard designs is also likely to have the physical space for ITX, Micro ATX, and regular ATX board sizes. That’s not to say anyone should install a tiny motherboard into a large case. For most builders, you’ll want to pick up a case that can support both Micro ATX and ATX board designs, leaving your options as open as possible.